FASHION REVOLUTION WEEK 2018, 23- 29 April

5 years since the Rana Plaza tragedy, what’s changed?

April 2018 will be the 5th year anniversary of the Rana Plaza factory collapse and 5 years since Fashion Revolution was born. During that time, millions of people have joined Fashion Revolution to demand a fairer, more transparent industry. It is clear that brands are listening and we are holding them to account. To ensure they continue to listen and create the far reaching, permanent change needed to ensure we never see a tragedy like Rana Plaza again, we need everyone to join Fashion Revolution and keep asking one simple question: Who Made My Clothes?

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5 achievements in 5 years

  1. Last year 2 million people across the world got involved. Over 100,000 people used social media to ask the brands they wear #whomademyclothes

  2. Brands are listening and the industry is starting to change. 2,416 brands responded to our #whomademyclothes demands sharing information about their supply chain. Over 150 big brands have published their factories where their clothes are made.

  3. Producers, farmers, factories and makers in our fashion supply chains have become more visible through social media. Last April, over 3600 producers were heard, with our hashtag #imadeyourclothes. And conditions have improved. Hundreds of factories in Bangladesh are now safer places to work. More than 1,300 factories have been inspected since Rana Plaza and 1.8 million garment workers have received factory safety information.1 515 factories, 87% of garment exporters in Cambodia, have published data about their working conditions compliance.

  4. Minimum wages for garment workers have increased in places like Bangladesh and Cambodia, but more still needs to be done. The Bangladesh government has delivered a 77% increase in the minimum wage to $68 per month for garment workers. 18 big brands and retailers have signed up to ACT to achieve living wages for workers with industry-wide collecting bargaining linked to purchasing practices.

  5. Brands are starting to reduce the use of toxic chemicals and clear up their supply chain. Over 70 brands and suppliers have committed to Detox by 2020 and remove harmful chemicals from their supply chains. Combined, these brands account for 15 percent of global textile production. Over 100 brands have committed to working towards a circular fashion system. But our landfills still overflow with clothes, the industry continues to get bigger and move faster. We buy more clothes than ever before and wear them for half as long as we used to. This is why we need to make our #lovedclotheslast.

Manifesto for a Fashion Revolution

During Fashion Revolution Week, we will be publishing our ‘Manifesto for a Fashion Revolution’ with our clear demands for a better fashion industry of the future. It will contain 10 points which call for our clothes to stop exploiting people and destroying our planet. It will demand radical, revolutionary change.

Fashion Revolution will ask people to sign up to the Manifesto in order to demonstrate the urgent need for change.

http://www.fashionrevolution.org/